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UEFA plot ‘Financial Fair Play 2.0’ with Manchester City, Chelsea and PSG targeted

Under the pressure of historical clubs such as Bayern Munich, Real Madrid and Barcelona, UEFA are planning reforms of Financial Fair Play with a new version of it, French newspaper Le Parisien reports.

Manchester City and PSG would be two of the clubs targeted by the latest assault on the nouveau riche, but a number of longer established clubs could also be at risk.

One of the ideas would be to impose a negative net spend limit of €100million, meaning if a club spend €300million in a summer, they would have to raise €200million in sales. For example, PSG spent €420million last summer and would have to sell €320million worth of players to comply with Financial Fair Play 2.0.

Another new rule under consideration, one that Manchester United could potentially be impacted by, would be controlling debt. Furthermore, one that seems intended to attack Manchester City and Chelsea in particular, UEFA are considering limiting clubs to 25 professionals, which would prevent the richest clubs from having stockpiles of talent. City and in particular Chelsea sign many players and loan them out, in City’s case often to benefit partner clubs in the City Football Group but also to raise their value and sell for profit as another source of income.

Finally, something that could make state-backed clubs worry, UEFA may look to define “related parties” much more precisely when it comes to revenue sources. City have a deal with Etihad – one in 2018 that is heavily undervalued – and a number of smaller sponsorship deals with companies from Abu Dhabi. PSG meanwhile, have a host of sponsors from Qatar such as QTA, QNB, Ooredoo and BeIN SPORTS, all of which could fall victim to the new “related parties” definition.

This project will be voted on on May 24 at a meeting of the UEFA Executive Committee, with UEFA having already drafted a 100 page dossier on what is being dubbed Financial Fair Play 2.0.

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